“let me see what I can do”

There are two things I love about this video.

The first is the idea of Rejection Therapy — I don’t know much about the actual game itself, but I like the intent of helping people become more comfortable with failure, and more confident in the face of rejection.

The second thing I love is the fact that this guy makes what he thinks is a ridiculous, doomed-to-fail request… and he has his wish granted. It’s an even more valuable lesson in going after what you want, even in the face of probable rejection. Even if the odds aren’t on your side — you never know when you’re going to catch a break.

Via Pardis Parker.

slow journalism

An intense, seven-year journey on foot, from the Rift Valley to Patagonia. Tracing our ancestors’ footsteps and telling stories along the way.

Can’t wait to follow along.

Via the Nieman Journalism Lab.

chapter two

Remember Richard Turere, the 13-year-old Kenyan inventor who invented an automated system of lights to scare lions away from his cattle? When I posted about him back in April, I said he was exactly the kind of person whose story we need to share, when we talk about sub-Saharan Africa.

Here’s a second chapter for that book: 15-year-old Kelvin Doe, from Sierra Leone.

attention public radio nerds

Ira Glass is everywhere in the last few days. Yesterday he was on CBC’s The Current. A quote:

“As a storyteller in my civilian life, I am at an utterly civilian level… Like, only somebody who is just at the normal level of being able to tell a story… would go to the trouble to think through what is the completely optimal way to make a story work.”

A few days ago, Ira did an “Ask A Grown Man” for Rookie. (Bonus: crash course in balloon animals.)

Via the This American Life blog.

He was also profiled in The Star last week.

And, finally, Toronto friends: Ira Glass is in your city this weekend to talk about making radio.

(If you want more Ira — who doesn’t? — this series isn’t new, but I re-visit it at least once a year and always seem to learn something new… especially from Part 3, which I think applies to life far beyond storytelling.)

i think i wanna marry you

I don’t think I would ever want to marry someone enough to go to that much work.

Although maybe I’m just bitter that I’m pretty sure I don’t know 60 people. Either way, this is extremely heart-warming, and a pretty great way to spend five minutes.