and he huffed, and he puffed

Journalism. Fairy tales. Outstanding production value. What’s not to love?

Via copyranter.

the ultimate price

“This is who she was, absolutely who she was and what she believed in: cover the story, not just have pictures of it, but bring it to life in the deepest way you could.” – Rosemarie Colvin, mother of Marie Colvin.

Marie Colvin lived that philosophy to the very end. Her last dispatch from Homs — her last dispatch ever — is haunting and overwhelming. If you haven’t read it, do it now.

A baby born in the basement last week looked as shellshocked as her mother, Fatima, 19, who fled there when her family’s single-storey house was  obliterated. “We survived by a miracle,” she whispers. Fatima is so  traumatised that she cannot breastfeed, so the baby has been fed only sugar and water; there is no formula milk.

That baby must be wondering what the hell she’s gotten herself into.

A damaged house in the Bab Sabaa neighbourhood of Homs. REUTERS/Moulhem Al-Jundi

insert salacious headline here

Interesting ethical debate of the day: how journalists use one another’s work online. It’s prompted by this article, an excerpt from Charles Duhigg’s new book The Power of Habit.

If you’re into journalism ethics, check out the debate. If you just want to know how Target is arguably scarier than Facebook — and also how you can stop biting your nails — just skip to the story itself.

Via j-source.

belly laughs at twenty to nine

In celebration of Valentine’s Day, The Current had a discussion about online dating this morning. The host, Anna Maria Tremonti, interviewed a couple who met in an Internet chat room in 1996. He lived in the U.K. and I didn’t catch where she lived, but I think it was in Canada. After a week of chatting, he bought her a ticket to visit him in England. An excerpt of the interview, paraphrased:

Anna Maria: Weren’t you afraid he was an axe murder?
Her: That’s what my friends were worried about, but I figured that an axe murderer doesn’t buy someone a plane ticket.
Him: Plus I’ve never hurt an axe in my life!

I laughed most of the way to work.

Speaking of axe murdering… well, murdering, anyway… here’s a cheerful (but sort of fascinating) read.